Welcome2022-02-17T00:34:41+00:00

Formerly a university teacher, I am now a freelance writer specialising in the theory and practice of diplomacy from the earliest times until the present. As well as hoping to encourage the study of diplomacy, this site provides periodic updating of my textbook (see immediately below). This page contains some news and views. The contents of the rest of the site can be navigated via the column on the left-hand side.

Diplomacy: Theory and Practice

6th edition
(Palgrave-Macmillan: Basingstoke and New York, 2022)

NEW EDITION is now available here

Citations 2.5 times the ‘discipline’ average in 2018 (Bookmetrix)

CLICK HERE FOR ONLINE UPDATING

G. R. Berridge Diplomacy 6th edition

From the back cover:

“This is a highly welcome update for the best general introduction to the theory and practice of diplomacy. It is clear enough to be recommended to undergraduate students, yet sufficiently thoughtful and incisive to be read with profit by practitioners and experts.”
—John W. Young, Emeritus Professor of International History, University of Nottingham, UK

Diplomacy: Theory and Practice is a tour de force in diplomacy scholarship. Geoff Berridge has not only written the definitive text in diplomatic studies; he has done so in a lucid, accessible, and engaging way that sets the gold standard for how books should be written. Weaving together historical cases with contemporary examples, Berridge has given us essential reading for any student of international politics.”
—Marcus Holmes, Associate Professor of Government, College of William & Mary, USA

Diplomacy and Secret Service

A short introduction

(DiploFoundation: 2019)

Invitations to Diplomacy series

Available to purchase on the ISSUU platform here

Updating by chapter is available here

The front cover shows the building used as its headquarters by the British Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) since 1994. Inspired in design by Art Deco, Mayan and Aztec architecture, it is sometimes described mockingly as ‘Legoland’ but more commonly referred to as ‘Vauxhall Cross’. This is because of its location adjacent to the major crossroads of this name in the Vauxhall district of south-west London; it is also close to Vauxhall Bridge over the River Thames. The building has served as a backdrop for a number of James Bond films. Photograph (cropped slightly for design purposes) by Jim Bowen, 22 November 2007, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic.

Ukraine diplomacy?

2 March 2022

The prospects for any serious role for diplomacy in the Ukraine crisis at the moment seem negligible. Read more.

Is Boris Johnson a crypto-fascist?

6 November, 2021

Probably not. But events of the last week, when added to an already long list of anti-democratic actions by the British prime minister, strengthen the possibility that he might as well be. I refer to his recent attempt to save a fellow Brexiteer and chum from mild punishment for spectacularly breaching parliamentary rules against paid advocacy by changing them after the event. Read more.

America’s headless embassies

11 October 2021

Astonishing to report, almost nine months since the inauguration of US President Joe Biden in January, a huge number of ambassadorial positions at US embassies and key bodies such as NATO, the EU, and the OECD, as well as senior positions in the Department of State, remain unfilled. Why has this happened and why is it serious? Read more.

Embassies and transnational repression

25 May, 2021

If the vicious authoritarian regime of Alexander Lukashenko in Belarus, now a Russian puppet state in eastern Europe, will force down an EU civil airliner in order to seize, imprison and torture an opposition journalist, it seems to me that we are entitled to ask: To what lengths will this and any regime of a similar nature also go in using their embassies to pursue their opponents in the diaspora – to engage in what is now known as ‘transnational repression’? Read more.

Boris Johnson: the charge sheet

1 May 2021

I’ve blogged very little of late, being taken up with spring gardening jobs and wrapping up a new book but I am forced back to it by the need to sound off yet again about that ‘greased piglet’, Boris Johnson, who still seems able to get away with murder – or at least manslaughter. Read more.

‘Brexit: a tragic national error’

1 January, 2021

Thus the headline on The Guardian’s eloquent editorial today, New Year’s Day 2021, the day on which the UK starts life outside the European Union. I have nothing to add to it – except be sure to click on the link ‘led by journalists’ (hell, there it is, I’ve provided it myself) in order to re-read Max Hastings’s justly famous exposé of Boris Johnson’s true character.

Boris Johnson takes UK down

11 December, 2020

Brexit head-banger in chief, first liar of the United Kingdom, and second-rate comedian, Boris Johnson, is primed to lead the UK, with sickening relish and grinning the while, into the abyss. Read more.

Johnson’s Britain and the price of breaking international law

12 September 2020

The moral and political decay of Boris Johnson’s government has now marked a new low. It has been forced to admit publicly that it is willing to break an important international agreement signed and ratified less than a year earlier. The price of this is already significant and, unless it is stopped, will become much heavier. Read more.

US election: Democrats v. Anti-democrats

4 September 2020

‘The danger is now clear: Trump is destroying democracy in broad daylight.’ Such is the heading of Jonathan Freedland’s column in The Guardian today. Few writers could have summed up this frightening threat with more eloquence and authority. I urge all visitors to this site to read this article.

At very low cost, the US election campaign can be followed in detail via the digital edition of The New York Times. Students, I believe, can get an even lower rate than the one I am paying. Visit this page.

Russia Report finally disgorged

21 July 2020

After nine months since it was cleared for publication by the British Intelligence Community (IC) but then withheld by Boris Johnson’s government, the Russia Report has finally been released. Read more.

An honorary consul in the pandemic

7 July 2020

On 2 July 2020 I received an email from Razvan Constantinescu, the energetic Romanian Honorary-Consul General for the south-west of England based in Bristol and president of the Bristol Consular Corps. This told me how the Covid 19 pandemic first revolutionised the nature of his work load, and then reduced it to a ‘walk in the park’. Read more.

The hole in the fence

14 June 2020

I am a keen gardener, and during the lockdown I had the great good fortune to be allowed by our neighbour to take over the care of her very large, tree-lined, and blissfully quiet garden. The weather was also unusually good, so I spent on average 6 hours a day working in it through late March, April and May. I could have wished for nothing more. Read more.

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